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The vision of Project Tomorrow is to ensure that today’s students are well prepared to be tomorrow’s innovators, leaders and engaged citizens of the world.  We believe that by supporting the innovative uses of science, math and technology resources in our K-12 schools and communities, students will develop the critical thinking, problem solving and creativity skills needed to compete and thrive in the 21st century.

Paying it forward:
Leveraging Today’s Female Voices in Ed Tech

http://schedule.sxswedu.com/events/event_EDUP42258
#edtech4women

Tuesday, March 10
3:00PM - 4:00PM

Austin Convention Center Room 12AB
500 East Cesar Chavez Street
SXSWedu.com

This panel brings together female change agents intentionally gathered from across the ed tech space with the hope of examining the unique role women can play at this interesting nexus of education and technology.  The discussion will be anchored around data on the presence, role, and level of influence of female voices in education and will include personal histories and testimonies on the growth in this field.

Join the conversation to hear from and interact with Nashville district leadership, the CEO of Project Tomorrow, a Vice President from BrainPOP, and the Director of the National Council of Teachers of English, all of whom have been national leaders in their field and have lent their expertise and vision to the work of the board of ISTE, the International Society of Technology in Education.  Research has demonstrated that the today’s young girls and women need role models in technology fields to develop self-efficacy in these fields.  While women have dominated the teaching profession for over the past century, the role of women as technology leaders within education is still emerging.

This interactive discussion explores multiple paths to ed tech leadership, including through university doctoral work, leadership with state and federal grants,  school district leadership, lending thought influence to visionary agencies such as Horizon K12 and Digital Promise, research  expertise, corporate America or a membership association, and contributing to the industry conversation through publications and at conferences such as SXSWedu.  The experiences of this diverse panel of education technology leaders will provide invaluable input into new best practices for supporting young girls and women in this field.  Whether you are examining how to further your own personal voice in the space, grow your PLN and exploring new professional career paths, or you are interested in how to leverage the experiences of women who are currently in this field to mentor and coach the next great generation of female ed tech leaders, this is a conversation you won’t want to miss. 



Panelists

Dr. Kari Stubbs

Dr. Kari Stubbs
Vice President, Learning & Innovation
BrainPOP
kstubbs@brainpop.com
@karistubbs
Linkedin

Dr. Kari Stubbs is an internationally recognized educator who began her career as a public school teacher in Kansas and Texas. Currently, she serves as Vice President of Learning and Innovation at BrainPOP.  Kari has presented extensively on the subject of technology and education, keynoting and speaking at conferences across the United States and around the globe from Shanghai and Dubai to Australia, Prague, Beijing, and beyond. This past year, she shared her expertise at the UNESCO Headquarters in Paris as part of Mobile Learning week. Kari was elected to the International Society of Technology in Education (ISTE) board in 2011, where she continues her service. In 2012, she amplified her board leadership presence by participating in the ISTE Australia Study tour. Her work with the board earned her a Presidential Community Service Award, and she also received an ISTE "Making It Happen" Award. Kari was also recognized by the NSBA as "20 to Watch" in 2006.  Additionally, she sits on the Horizon K12 Report board. Anthony Salcito, Microsoft's Vice President of Education, named her a Global Hero in Education.


Julie Evans

Julie Evans
Chief Executive Officer
Project Tomorrow
jevans@tomorrow.org
@JulieEvans_PT

Julie Evans has been CEO of Project Tomorrow (www.tomorrow.org), one of the nation’s leading education nonprofit organizations, since 1999. She developed the Speak Up National Research Project in 2003 and has served as the chief researcher on this project and other digital learning national research projects. Previously, Ms. Evans enjoyed a 17-year career in national and regional sales and marketing management with Unisys and two education technology startups. She is a graduate of Brown University and serves on the Board of Directors of Project Tomorrow, the Reaching At-Promise Students Association Advisory Board, and the TechSETS Advisory Board.  She is a frequent speaker, writer and commentator on K-12 and higher education issues around digital learning.  Ms. Evans was named in April 2008 as one of the Top Ten Most Influential People in Education Technology over the past 10 years by eSchool News.


Dr. Mila Thomas Fuller

Dr. Mila Thomas Fuller
Deputy Executive Director
National Council of Teachers of English
mfuller@ncte.org
@milafuller

Dr. Mila Thomas Fuller is the deputy executive director of the National Council of Teachers of English and is responsible for assisting with the oversight and implementation of organizational goals. Her research interests include the impact of digital graphic organizers on the persuasive writing process, impact of school administrator support on the integration of technology into schools, and relationships between community and student success in online learning.  Prior to joining NCTE, she served as director of strategic initiatives for the International Society for Technology in Education.

Dr. Fuller has served as an instructional technologist at all levels of education and has provided national and international presentations focused on improving teaching and learning by advancing the effective use of technology in education.  Dr. Fuller has served as the president of the Maryland Society of Educational Technology and is the recipient of ISTE’s Making “IT” Happen Award.  Currently, she serves on the ISTE Board of Directors and was recently named Technology Task Force Chair for the Champaign Urbana Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.


Dr. Kecia Ray

Dr. Kecia Ray
Executive Director Learning Technology and Library Services
Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools
keciaray@gmail.com
@keciaray

Dr. Ray began her career as a middle school science teacher where she taught in one of the first 21st Century classrooms in the state of Georgia. She was the first classroom teacher in her district to adopt videoconferencing technology in 1995. Dr. Ray's career also includes designing technology within the Frist Center for the Visual Arts and directing technology research through Vanderbilt University School of Medicine NSF and NIH funded Science Outreach programs. Dr. Ray works full time for Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools overseeing the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional technology programs including instructional design for online and blended learning environments and library services.

After publishing an assessment for measuring technology literacy in 1999, she conducted research in US, Canada and South Africa in the areas of technology adoption in the K-12 classroom and the use of distance learning technologies to facilitate engaging learning environments.

Dr. Ray is a member of the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) where she is Past President of SIGOL, a special interest group focused on online learning environments, and Chair of the ISTE Board of Directors. She served on the Board of Directors for the Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education until 2012. Locally she serves on the Davidson County Community Education Commission, the Foster Care Review Board of Davidson County and Tenn-Share Board. In 2013, Governor Haslem appointed her to his Advisory Council on Alternative Education. Dr. Ray is published in the area of instructional technology and presents nationally and internationally on topics related to learning technology and education policy. She was the recipient of the Presidents Volunteer Service award in 2012.

She lives in Nashville with her husband Dr. Clark Ray and their son Wes.